The Respect for Marriage Act, codifying same-sex marriage as federal law, already decided as such by the Supreme Court in the Obergefell decision in 2015, has now passed the Senate. If it passes in the House, President Joe Biden will sign it into law.

Let's take a moment and consider what is going on.

Some view acceptance of same sex marriage as a bold new step to a freer and more just society. But, despite Gallup now showing 71% in favor of same-sex marriage, 58% of those who attend church weekly are opposed.

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Republicans are rightly wondering what to expect from the upcoming House of Representatives controlled by their party.

Conservatives are chomping at the bit to move a hardcore conservative agenda.

My own beliefs and convictions are known. We need dramatic change to pull the nation out of its fiscal, cultural and moral chaos.

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Among the key headlines from the 2022 election were gains by Republicans among minority voters.

According to the AP VoteCast survey, Republican House candidates got 14% of the Black vote, almost twice the 8% of the Black vote that Republicans captured in 2020 and 2018.

The difference between the percentage of Black votes that Democrats got compared to Republicans was 68 points, compared to a difference of 83 points in the 2020 election and 82 points in 2018.

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President Joe Biden's $400 billion 2022 election bribe -- also known as student loan forgiveness -- has been now stopped in its tracks on two fronts.

First, in Texas, federal district court Judge Mark Pittman, one of nearly 300 federal judges appointed by former President Donald Trump, ruled the initiative unconstitutional. The judge rejected Biden's claim that the 2003 Heroes Act gives him authority to wipe out these loans. That act, per the judge, was about loan assistance for military personal during war or other emergencies.

The lawsuit was filed by the Job Creators Network Foundation on behalf of two students holding loans that did not qualify for the relief, demonstrating the inequities of the initiative and the failure to provide the usual comment period for citizens to voice concerns.

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The Supreme Court just heard arguments in the case Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard and Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina.

It's about affirmative action -- universities using race and ethnicity in their admissions policies.

Students for Fair Admissions argues that both universities violate the U.S. Constitution in their discriminatory admissions policies. They discriminate against Asian Americans in favor of whites, Blacks and Hispanics and unlawfully discriminate to achieve diversity that could be achieved in a race-neutral fashion.

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As Democrats see the likelihood of the House and the Senate shifting to Republican control, they have rolled out their biggest gun to try to minimize the damage.

Former President Barack Obama, the most popular Democrat in the country, has hit the campaign trail to try to salvage victories in close and critical races.

Obama's headline message has been about the importance of voting. Meaning, turnout is critical for Democrats, and, in particular, high turnout among Black voters.

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A supporter of my organization sent a video he made driving around in downtown Los Angeles.

Homelessness and crime are rampant. It is shocking to see the social chaos prevailing in one of America's major cities. It is a hard pill to swallow to see the streets of downtown Los Angeles teeming with homelessness.

The crisis is defining the current race for the new mayor of Los Angeles. One candidate, Karen Bass, is the quintessential insider. She is a six-term Democratic congresswoman, former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus and former speaker of California state assembly.

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As November elections approach, the glaring and deeply troubling headline I see is Americans becoming increasingly alienated from their own country.

There has never been a greater need for a new generation of leaders to restore clarity about American principles and plant them in American hearts and minds.

The Wall Street Journal reports that all branches of the U.S. military are coming up short in recruiting goals.

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Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his political activist wife, Ginni, are a high-profile Washington conservative power couple.

Power couples are a common Washington phenomenon. Each spouse wields political power and influence in a certain arena. Together they concentrate power and influence.

Per Public Citizen, of the 115th Congress, 59% of retiring congressmen remained in Washington, taking jobs as lobbyists or in consulting firms, trade groups or business groups, working to influence government.

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Republicans are gearing up for elections in November by drawing a clear line in the sand between their party and Democrats.

Republicans have rolled out what they call Commitment to America. And this is exactly what it's about.

Our country embodies a worldview, and it is that worldview, and the principles that capture that worldview, that made and makes America a great nation.

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In August of 1790, President George Washington visited Rhode Island, which a few months earlier had ratified the U.S. Constitution.

Among those who welcomed the new president was the Hebrew Congregation of Rhode Island, founded in 1763. Now known as the Touro Synagogue, it is the oldest standing synagogue in the nation.

The synagogue's representative wrote to the president, expressing gratitude that Jews in Rhode Island, in the newly formed United States of America, lived, in contrast to their co-religionists in other parts of the world, with "invaluable rights as free citizens."

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New polling data from Gallup show Americans are not having an easy time through this period of rising prices.

According to Gallup, 56% of Americans say now that rising prices are causing severe or moderate hardship.

Drilling down, we see that the hardship is not shared equally.

Among low-income households, those with income less than $48,000, 74% report they are experiencing hardship. Among middle-income households, with income $48,000 to $89,999, 63% report hardship. And among upper income, $90,000 and above, 40% report experiencing hardship.

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President Joe Biden travelled to Philadelphia, to Independence Hall, the place where the nation's founders signed the Declaration of Independence, to make his case for "The Continued Battle for the Soul of the Nation."

Indeed, the president, in his remarks, said we are at an "inflection point" regarding where we stand and the path we'll take for the future.

It is one of those rare moments when I agree with our president.

We are in a tug of war for our future.

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http://eljimadorrestaurante.net/No sooner had President Joe Biden announced his plan for student loan debt forgiveness -- $10,000 for non-Pell grant recipients and $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients -- the president of the NAACP was complaining that it should be more than twice as much. At least $50,000.

Brookings Institution scholar Andre M. Perry echoed the sentiment.

The plan, according to Perry, "does not go far enough in addressing the root of the problem: a postsecondary education system that has seen tuition rise three-fold in the last 30 years. That same system will put future borrowers in peril."

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I wrote a column in 2011, as the presidential politics of the upcoming year were starting to unfold, with the headline "Why 2012 looks a lot like 1860."

The deep fracturing of the American electorate -- remember the Tea Party? -- leading up to the 2012 presidential election was starting to look like what happened in the presidential election in 1860, which occurred amid another massive splintering of the American electorate.

The issue of slavery in the 1850s -- whether or the extent to which it should or could be tolerated in America -- tore apart the fabric of common values in the nation, and the result was collapse.

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A central pillar of the just-passed Inflation Reduction Act is $80 billion going to the IRS to hire some 87,000 new agents, doubling the current force, to chase down U.S. taxpayers who allegedly are not meeting their tax obligations.

The rationale is we have a large national budget deficit -- that is, government is bringing in less money than it spends -- so a larger army of IRS agents chasing down tax deadbeats will help solve our nation's fiscal problems.

But part of this same new law in which U.S. taxpayers are asked to spend $80 billion to hire more IRS agents to shake down their neighbors who are supposedly not paying their fair share, there is $430 billion in new government spending, a large portion of which is earmarked for green energy projects of various shapes and forms.

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