Citadel Will Receive Sword of Confederate Officer Killed in Action Without Mention of Confederacy

The Citadel, South Carolina’s military academy has a proud unsurpassed history that has inspired students and graduates to achieve heroic excellence in battle since the early days of the Republic. Sadly, political correctness that has spread Confederaphobia throughout academia has now infected the formerly proud Citadel.

Next week, the current caretakers of the Citadel will degrade the memory of a graduate of the first Citadel class who died heroically in battle. Some Alumni are unhappy and will not attend the event.

In 1846, Charles Courtenay Tew was graduated from the first class at the Citadel and afterward taught there. In 1857, he was Captain Tew, Superintendent of the Arsenal Academy, a preparatory school for the Citadel in Columbia. In 1858, Tew resigned to found the North Carolina Military Academy in Hillsboro.

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Jackson Lee Tucker received the Julia Jackson OCR Youth of the Year Award for 2015. This award is named for the only child of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson and his wife Anna. The award was presented by Mosie Marlar, Chapter President of Varina Howell Davis Chapter 1, OCR, on behalf of the South Carolina Division of the Order of Confederate Rose, following the meeting of 16th Regiment, SC Volunteers, Camp 36 SCV, on Thursday, July 23, 2015, presented by Caroline S. Coleman 537, of which he is a member and chapter officer.

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DixieRepublic_Page-03Governor Haley and national retailers are banning flags and other southern products and driving customers to Dixie Republic.

Furman University graduate and former North Greenville University art professor Scott Goldsmith has a family heritage deep in Southern history. He also had a vision. Honoring his ancestors is not a hobby or game for Goldsmith. It is a very serious matter and the center of his being.

A few years ago he began an adventure that no other had knowingly undertaken. He purchased a plot of land on Highway 25 north of Travelers Rest and built a small log store. He stocked and sold only “Southern merchandise,” that ranged from Bluegrass CD’s to wood carvings and a collection of flags that had been flown by Southern States before, during and after the War Between the States.

Soon his business outgrew the log building and he purchased a larger tract of land further up the highway and constructed a larger facility. It seemed he was constantly enlarging and expanding the sales space to make room for more products.

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The Long Road Home

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Several members of the Joseph Brevard Kershaw Chapter #205 in Laurens attended the 150th anniversary of Lee’s surrender at Appomattox this past April, 2015.  The group of four, Jennifer Sawyer, Registrar; Martha Gilchrest, Historian; Kim Lambert, Recording Secretary; and Elaine Thorp, Newsletter Editor, went to an event which they all said they would never forget as long as they lived.  It was truly one of the most moving historical events of their lifetime, perhaps only equaled by the Hunley funeral some years back.  They were escorted by Thomas B. Sawyer, 1st Lieutenant Commander of the Brigadier General Samuel McGowan Camp #40.

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“Lets Stand up for what is Right and Never Back Down”

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The Honorable William “Bill” Chumley was the speaker at the Confederate Memorial Day Service at Springwood Cemetery in Greenville, Sunday, May 2nd.

The annual Confederate Memorial Day service is sponsored by the 16th Regiment, SC Volunteers, Camp 36SCV, and the Museum and Library of Confederate History owned and operated by the Camp.

The annual memorial service is part of the obligation of the Sons of Confederate Veterans that was given to the Sons and future generations of their children by Lieutenant General Stephen Dill Lee, Commander General , United Confederate Veterans in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1906. The charge stated:

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The Joseph Evan Davis 907 Children of the Confederacy held their April meeting at the New Hope United Methodist Church in Anderson, SC on Sunday afternoon, April 12, 2015. Along with members of the Winnie Davis 442 United Daughters of the Confederacy Chapter, they honored Chapter President, Allison Bolt’s Confederate ancestor, Abram Bolt and his wife Mary with a grave-cleaning, iron-cross-placing, and grave-rededicating event. Chapter Director Pamela Hamilton Durham discussed the military history and family of Abram Bolt. There were three generations of the Bolt family present today for this rededication service. Mr. Bolt shared pictures of these ancestors with the children as they learned to clean the grave of the veteran and his wife, under direction of grave restoration consultant Julia Barnes.  Michael Barnes and Danny Durham then showed the children how to properly install an iron cross. These men of the Sons of Confederate Veterans provided outstanding role models for the children. The children did a wonderful job in honoring a veteran and then recording the other veterans buried in this cemetery.

 

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Thousands of history enthusiasts from all over the country and across the ocean congregated in the little town of Appomattox, Virginia, this past week to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee, to Union General Ulysses S. Grant and his Army of the Potomac.

Activities commenced this past Wednesday and concluded on Sunday. During that period, the relatively small parking lot at the Appomattox Court House National Historic Site was closed to visitors. A sprawling, grassy field a couple of miles away served as a temporary parking area. Buses ran all day back and forth to the park.

For those who were coming from Lynchburg, 20-some miles away, other shuttle buses ran to and from that town. All of the services – parking, shuttle rides and admission to the park - were free.

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