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The sights and sounds of yesteryear came alive in Pendleton on Saturday as Ashtabula celebrated Old Farm Day.

Antique gas engines powered a plethora of machines, including a cotton gin and a hay bailer, just to name a few. Antique tractors and automobiles were on display as well.

The coolness of the day did not deter hundreds of people of all ages from coming out to enjoy the event. While some spectators meandered over the front lawn, inspecting the various and sundry exhibits, other visitors paid an extra $3.00 to take a guided tour, given by young ladies dressed in hoop skirts, of the Ashtabula mansion, which served as the backdrop for the day's festivities.

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Southerners were the original recycling advocates!  During the War Between the States, there were many shortages.   The UpCountry of 2015 has experienced several ice storms, power outages, and frozen water lines.  That is an inconvenience.  Early in the war years of 1861 and 1862, shortages in South Carolina were considered inconveniences, but as time went on, those inconveniences turned into hardships.  South Carolinians mastered the Economy of Scarcity!  On March 2, 2015, Mosie Marlar of Fountain Inn gave a wonderful presentation to the ladies of Winnie Davis 442 in Greenville on the topic of “Shortages, or Making Do.”  There are many methods that Southerners employed to manage through this dreadful time in our history, and Mrs. Marlar gave great details.

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The 16"‘ Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, Sons of Confederate Veterans, has owned and operated the Museum and Library of Confederate History at 15 Boyce Avenue in Greenville since 1996. From time to time the Museum chooses to honor certain members of its Board of Directors who have rendered outstanding service and distinguished themselves in dedication to the Museum and to the Confederate Cause.

This past Monday the Board of the Museum honored it's Chaplin, ]ohn Woods. Several members of the Board attended the monthly meeting of the Moses T. Fowler Camp #1721 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans in Fountain Inn last Monday evening and presented Chaplain Woods with a very attractive, framed Certificate of Appreciation.

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Jack Marlar from the Ft. Inn History Museum was the guest speaker at the annual Confederate Colonel’s Club banquet honoring General Robert Edward Lee, CSA. The event was held at the Hejaz Shrine Center in Mauldin, Saturday, January 17th. General Lee’s birthday is January 19 and he was born in 1807.

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The 16th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 36 held its annual Lee-Jackson Banquet on Saturday, January 17, 2015, at the Embassy Suites Greenville Golf Resort and Convention Center. Music for the event was provided by the Joyful Harps. The 16th SC Color Guard of Honor Posted the Colors. Salutes to the Flags were led by Robert Bolt. The Charge was given by Commander Doug Langley, who also welcomed everyone and recognized honored guests. The invocation was given by Chaplain Mark Evans. A delicious dinner was enjoyed by all the guests. Following the dinner, a cake cutting ceremony was held, with a cake honoring Generals Lee and Jackson being cut by a sword. Past Commander in Chief of the SCV, Chris Sullivan, introduced the speaker for the event, Chuck McMichael, Past Commander in Chief of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

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Mike Barnes & Tim Drake with gravestone of Mary Smith (Mike in blue outfit)There is a small hill off Serena Circle near Broadway Lake in Anderson County which holds the remainder of the old Broadaway Presbyterian Church cemetery.  Only two markers remain, those of Mary Smith and John George. The cemetery is marked on the 1877 map of Anderson Co.  Residents of Serena Circle remember that in the 1960’s and 1970’s, there were several field stones that were removed from the location when houses were built on the property.  Mrs. Smith’s marker is a crudely carven sentence - - - “ Here lies the body of Mary Smith, heroine of American Revolutionary, who died August 17th 1829, age 92 .  The markers are 1820's, and hand carved from soapstone, probably hewn from a local quarry and engraved by a local tombstone carver of the period. They are beautiful works of carving, and approximately four inches thick and five feet tall (about two feet of each were placed underground to keep them upright). Mr. Barnes, Dr. Drake, & the ladies of the Hudson Berry DAR plan to put a period-appropriate wooden picket fence around them to protect the site from animals and (hopefully) vandals. Mary Smith died in 1826 at 92 years of age! The markers are in remarkable condition for their age.

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Dixie-ActII

Lucy Allen and Marshall Goers were the featured musicians for Christmas in Dixie Act II. The couple are professional musicians and reside in Mauldin.

Allen was featured on the guitar and vocals. A native of Maryland, Allen holds a Ph.D. in folklore, took voice lessons and began playing guitar as an adolescent.

Marshall Goers played the guitar, mandolin, fiddle, banjo, accordion and dulcimer. He began taking accordion lessons at age nine in Coon Rapids, Minnesota. His family moved to Kentucky where he became acquainted with Bluegrass. He studied piano and played some trombone.

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