Will Black Empowerment Socialism Make South Africa Great?

In terms of natural resources, the Republic of South Africa is one of the richest counties in the world. Most people are aware that South Africa produces a large share of the world’s diamonds for jewelry and industrial purposes. In fact, 65 percent of diamond production comes from South Africa. It also has 50 percent of the world’s gold mine resources and 38 percent of known gold reserves. In 1993, it produced 30 percent of annual global gold production. South Africa still produces 12 percent of global gold production and ranks seventh internationally. South Africa ranks seventh in international coal production and is the third largest exporter of coal. It is also the third largest exporter of iron ore to the world’s largest iron ore user, China. South Africa has the fifth largest uranium reserves in the world.

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It’s true, life imitates art.

In 1960 there was a cult movie called, “Little Shop of Horrors.” It was re-released in 1986; its new lead actor was a fella named Rick Moranis who played the owner of a flower shop. One day he cuts his finger and lets the blood run into a small plant. One thing leads to another and over time the small plant grows to a massive size, and becomes addicted to blood. That, of course, is a metaphor for the institution of government in America. We have fed it our blood, it has become addicted to blood and has grown so large it is trying to take over our lives.

The Founding Fathers of America were a remarkable group. Not only were they able to design a model of government unsurpassed in human history, they were also willing and did pledge, “Our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.” That was no idle pledge, in fact, they put it all on the line.

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Might I suggest three things:

  1. One’s personal relationship with God.
  2. One’s relationship with one’s family and close personal friends.
  3. The ideas (knowledge, wisdom, understanding) that God gives one and one’s effective communication of them – one’s life work.

Yes, these are the things that matter.

In contrast, on our deathbeds, will it really matter who was elected president, sheriff, or school board trustee? About to face the Judge of the Universe, will it matter to us who sits on the Supreme Court of the United States?

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We all have them – memories, that is. Though some may fade with the passing of time, many of our precious recollections of the past stay with us for a lifetime. This truth was emphasized to me several years ago when, on a local radio station, I listened to what I believe to be one of the most beautiful and haunting secular songs I’ve ever heard. It brought tears to my eyes then, not so much for any memories it stirred in me, sad to say, but for the depth of emotion projected by the man who was singing it. His name is John McDermott, and he was the founder of the famous singing group known as “The Irish Tenors.” I urge you to enter “John McDermott YouTube” on your search engine and click on the video of his performance of “The Old Man” (with lyrics), a beautiful song he sang in memory of his father. You will see, and hear, a truly special performance, I assure you. It still brings tears to my eyes whenever I watch it.

John was born in Scotland, but his family moved to Canada when he was ten, and he’s a citizen of that country. The words and music were written by Phil Coulter, and I trust it will affect you as it did me:

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George Orwell’s book “1984” painted a grim picture of society.   One aspect of that Orwellian society was a pervasive surveillance that existed everywhere.  “Big brother is watching you,” was a theme of that society and book.  Orwell told his story as a warning against totalitarianism and the total dominance of the police state. In 1949, when it was published, no one had envisioned the internet, Wi-Fi, Facebook, or Google.  In fact, to many people computers were still a thing of science fiction.

It is now nearly 60 years later.  Today we live in a society where there is a tremendous amount of interconnectivity.  We can phone, text, or Skype, etc., with almost anyone anywhere in the world.  One of our pastors recently did a short-term mission trip to Nepal and was a bit embarrassed to find that most of the kids on the streets in the cities he visited had better smartphones than he had.  Both as individuals and as society, we have incredible technical tools at our disposal. 

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Take a deep breath and calm down. This public service announcement is directed at all parties currently hyperventilating, for whatever the reason.

The recent affront to Congressman Trey Gowdy by the always ludicrous poser Adam Schiff D-Calif., calling him “one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse,” was over the line. Such comments shadow other, more bombastic and even more absurd comments by ‘Mad’ Max Waters, D-Calif, who called for outright violence against all Trump supporters. Those are members of Congress, Democrats mind you, elected by some obviously confused, if not disturbed, element of Americans. Here is a brief menu of some other issues offered by the Democrats, over which you are expected to become hysterical.

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Old Gran Army Burian Ground - Boston. Grave of Christopher Seider and 5 patriots kille din the Boston Massacre is to the left of Samuel Adam's grave.
Old Gran Army Burian Ground - Boston. Grave of Christopher Seider and 5 patriots kille din the Boston Massacre is to the left of Samuel Adam's grave.

In part 1 of this foray into almost forgotten colonial history, we explored the tensions that had arisen over a period of several years over the hated Townshend Acts, laws enacted from the far away British Parliament which placed taxes, or increased tariffs, on many goods imported from Great Britain. Tax protests soon erupted throughout the British American colonies, none more intense than in and around Boston, in the British colony of Massachusetts. It was in one of these “angry mob” protests, on February 22, 1770, that 11-year-old Christopher Seider, who had involved himself (accidentally or on purpose—no one knows), lost his life and became to be considered by his countrymen as the first martyr for the cause of American freedom.

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